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Message: Re: Can't understand why this chord change works...

Changed By: Viz
Change Date: March 28, 2017 12:41AM

Re: Can't understand why this chord change works...
When you strip out all the augs, dims, 6ths and 7ths, and bearing in mind that, as you say, that I has a strong 1st inv feel about it, meaning it's easy to see it as a iii, and until the last bar when it breaks down, they're basically all V-I (or v-I or V-i) cadences. However, as it happens, the specific case of the first interval, the IV to VII, is the only interval in the major scale that has a 4th spread over a tritone, so it's not actually a perfect cadence but but in all other ways it fits into the repeating ascending 4ths (or descending 5ths) progression.

You get the same in the minor key; check out Parisienne walkways, in Am: Am - Dm - G - C - F - Bdim (trather than B flat) ....... <- that last interval is the tritone; it's the VI - ii, which if you take the relative major of Am, which is C major, would be the IV-VII again. You're always going to get that tritone somewhere otherwise you'd need to go round all 12 keys before you landed on the tonic again; Parisienne Walkways tackles the tritone at the end of the progression; Accustomed to her smile tackles it at the beginning.
When you strip out all the augs, dims, 6ths and 7ths, and bearing in mind that, as you say, that I has a strong 1st inv feel about it, meaning it's easy to see it as a iii, and until the last bar when it breaks down, they're basically all V-I (or v-I or V-i) cadences. However, as it happens, the specific case of the first interval, the IV to VII, is the only interval in the major scale that has a 4th spread over a tritone, so it's not actually a perfect cadence but in all other ways it fits into the repeating ascending 4ths (or descending 5ths) progression.

You get the same in the minor key; check out Parisienne walkways, in Am: Am - Dm - G - C - F - Bdim (rather than B flat) ....... <- that last interval is the tritone; it's the VI - ii, which if you take the relative major of Am, which is C major, would be the IV-VII again. You're always going to get that tritone somewhere otherwise you'd need to go round all 12 keys before you landed on the tonic again; Parisienne Walkways tackles the tritone at the end of the progression; Accustomed to her Smile tackles it at the beginning.

Original Message

Author: Viz
Date: March 28, 2017 12:20AM

Re: Can't understand why this chord change works...
When you strip out all the augs, dims, 6ths and 7ths, and bearing in mind that, as you say, that I has a strong 1st inv feel about it, meaning it's easy to see it as a iii, and until the last bar when it breaks down, they're basically all V-I (or v-I or V-i) cadences. However, as it happens, the specific case of the first interval, the IV to VII, is the only interval in the major scale that has a 4th spread over a tritone, so it's not actually a perfect cadence but but in all other ways it fits into the repeating ascending 4ths (or descending 5ths) progression.

You get the same in the minor key; check out Parisienne walkways, in Am: Am - Dm - G - C - F - Bdim (trather than B flat) ....... <- that last interval is the tritone; it's the VI - ii, which if you take the relative major of Am, which is C major, would be the IV-VII again. You're always going to get that tritone somewhere otherwise you'd need to go round all 12 keys before you landed on the tonic again; Parisienne Walkways tackles the tritone at the end of the progression; Accustomed to her smile tackles it at the beginning.