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Message: Re: Score analysis

Changed By: Athair
Change Date: April 24, 2017 08:02AM

Re: Score analysis
Thanks! Interesting! By now i tend to think of score analysis as a mean of enabling a sort of schenkerian-type of analysis: that is, getting in touch with the development of structural vs extension degrees in a given piece, etc.

After a rather heavy time studying harmony and counterpoint (though in a self-taught fashion and in the reverse order) i've only recently started to get some issues that still seem to be elementary: for instance, the harmonic difference among several dispositions of a given chord (either triad or not). It seems like you could write a simple motive going from, say I to V, by writing a fixed chord (I, for example) within a sequence of varying dispositions: among some of those you could have a few which harmonic features resembles a sort of pedal-like V effect, etc. By so doing, you would eventually get a more "grounded" outcome than otherwise, so to speak.

Another related issue could be getting to know whether a given chord-progression's harmony is dominated by some interval, etc. Assuming it was, then some extension (i.e.additional chords) could be written in order to either change such an interval onwards or to keep it, etc.

By the way, what are the issues you would drive your attention towards to when analysing some score? Greetings!
Changed By: Athair
Change Date: April 24, 2017 08:00AM

Re: Score analysis
Thanks! Interesting! By now i tend to think of score analysis as a mean of enabling a sort of schenkerian-type of analysis: that is, getting in touch with the development of structural vs extension degrees in a given piece, etc.

After a rather heavy time studying harmony and counterpoint (though in a self-taught fashion and in the reverse order) i've only recently started to get some issues that still seem to be elementary: for instance, the harmonic difference among several dispositions of a given chord (either triad or not). It seems like you could write a simple motive going from, say I to V, by writing a fixed chord (I, for example) within a sequence of varying dispositions: among some of those you could have a few which harmonic features resembles a sort of pedal-like V effect, etc. By so doing, you would eventually get a more "grounded" outcome than otherwise, so to speak.

Another related issue could be getting to know whether a given chord-progression's harmony is dominated by some interval, etc. Assuming it was, then some extension (i.e.additional chords) could be wrote written in order to either change such an interval onwards or to keep it, etc.

By the way, what are the issues you would drive your attention towards when analysing some score? Greetings!
Changed By: Athair
Change Date: April 24, 2017 07:59AM

Re: Score analysis
Thanks! Interesting! By now i tend to think of score analysis as a mean of enabling a sort of schenkerian-type of analysis: that is, getting in touch with the development of structural vs extension degrees in a given piece, etc.

After a rather heavy time studying harmony and counterpoint (though in a self-taught fashion and in the reverse order) i've only recently started to get some issues that still seem to be elementary: for instance, the harmonic difference among several dispositions of a given chord (either triad or not). It seems like you could write a simple motive going from, say I to V, by writing a fixed chord (I, for example) within a sequence of varying dispositions: among some of those you could have a few which harmonic features resembles a sort of pedal-like V effect, etc. By so doing, you would eventually get a more "grounded" outcome than otherwise, so to speak.

Another related issue could be getting to know whether a given chord -progression 's harmony is dominated by some interval, etc. Assuming it was, then some extension (i.e.additional chords) could be made wrote in order to either change such an interval onwards or to keep it, etc.

By the way, what are the issues you would drive your attention towards when analysing some score? Greetings!

Original Message

Author: Athair
Date: April 24, 2017 07:56AM

Re: Score analysis
Thanks! Interesting! By now i tend to think of score analysis as a mean of enabling a sort of schenkerian-type of analysis: that is, getting in touch with the development of structural vs extension degrees in a given piece, etc.

After a rather heavy time studying harmony and counterpoint (though in a self-taught fashion and in the reverse order) i've only recently started to get some issues that still seem to be elementary: for instance, the harmonic difference among several dispositions of a given chord (either triad or not). It seems like you could write a simple motive going from, say I to V, by writing a fixed chord (I, for example) within a sequence of varying dispositions: among some of those you could have a few which harmonic features resembles a sort of pedal-like V effect, etc. By so doing, you would eventually get a more "grounded" outcome than otherwise, so to speak.

Another related issue could be getting to know whether a given chord progression is dominated by some interval, etc. Assuming it was, then some extension could be made in order to either change such an interval onwards or to keep it, etc.

By the way, what are the issues you would drive your attention towards when analysing some score? Greetings!