Welcome! Log In Create A New Profile

Advanced

Change History

Don't understand seventh chords? Need some tricks for learning key signatures? Post your questions here, or see if you can answer someone else's question.

Message: Re: Problem when creating harmonies

Changed By: Fretsource
Change Date: May 01, 2017 01:39AM

Re: Problem when creating harmonies
If you're a guitarist and mostly play in standard tuning then you should learn all the fretboard interval patterns. As I'm sure you know, octaves follow the 2-up, 2-up rule, meaning an octave above any note on string 6 & 5 can be found two strings higher and 2 frets higher. (for strings 4 & 3 it's 2 up and 3 (frets) up).

The same applies to every interval, Each has a pattern that can be memorised.

For example, Perfect 5ths are 1 up 2 up, so from any note on strings 6, 5 or 4, a perfect 5th above can be found 1 string higher and 2 frets higher. Again, the 'formula' changes for string 3 (1 up - 3 up).

By learning the patterns, you can instantly find the right note even if you don't immediately know what it's called. For example, what note is an augmented 4th. above G on string 6 fret 3? While you're working it out, your finger would immediately follow the memorised aug 4 pattern and move 1 up - 1 up - i.e, string 5 fret 4 (C#). When you're playing, you don't have time to mentally name the required harmony note and then go looking for it. Apply the pattern, to get the required note instantly.

When it comes to keeping it in key, you have to make another adjustment, For example if you want to harmonise in 5ths above a melody in the key of C major, the pattern will be the same for all notes except for the note a 5th above the leading note (B) which will be one fret lower as it needs a diminished 5th (tritone) to stay in key - i.e F, not F#. All the rest are perfect 5ths so the pattern is exactly the same anywhere along the length of the fretboard

If you're interested, I have a webpage app that teaches all the patterns, not only for locating notes of intervals but also chord tones and scale degrees. It shows an unnamed section of fretboard. It's unnamed because the same patterns apply regardless of which section of the fretboard you use. It prevents you from thinking in note name and forces you to think in patterns.

Check it out on a laptop - not a phone as it's Flash-based and won't display on phones. And ask about anything that isn't clear. I'm always interested to know how people use it. The default setting is for chord tones so select the 'intervals' tab under the white text box and click play.

Here it is www,fretsource-guitar.weebly.com/fretboard-navigation-trainer.html
Check it out on a laptop - not a phone as it's Flash-based and won't display on phones. And ask about anything that isn't clear. I'm always interested to know how people use it. The default setting is for chord tones so select the 'intervals' tab under the white text box and click play. If you use TEST MODE, you have to click where you think the required note will be. The app will keep track of your score and time taken to find the note.

Here it is fretsource-guitar.weebly.com/fretboard-navigation-trainer.html
Changed By: Fretsource
Change Date: May 01, 2017 01:31AM

Re: Problem when creating harmonies
If you're a guitarist and mostly play in standard tuning then you should learn all the fretboard interval patterns. As, As I'm sure you know, octaves follow the 2-up, 2-up rule, meaning an octave above any note on string 6 & 5 can be found two strings higher and 2 frets higher. (for strings 4 & 3 it's 2 up and 3 (frets) up).

The same applies to every interval, Each has a pattern that can be memorised.

For example, Perfect 5ths are 1 up 2 up, so from any note on strings 6, 5 or 4, a perfect 5th above can be found 1 string higher and 2 frets higher. Again, the 'formula' changes for strings 3 (1 up - 3 up).

By learning the patterns, you can instantly find the right note even if you don't immediately know what it's called. For example, what note is an augmented 4th. above G on string 6? While you're working it out, your finger would immediately follow the memorised pattern and move 1 up - 1up - i.e, string 5 fret 2 (C#). When you're playing, you don't have time to mentally name the required harmony note and then go looking for it. Apply the pattern, to get the required note instantly.
For example, Perfect 5ths are 1 up 2 up, so from any note on strings 6, 5 or 4, a perfect 5th above can be found 1 string higher and 2 frets higher. Again, the 'formula' changes for string 3 (1 up - 3 up).

By learning the patterns, you can instantly find the right note even if you don't immediately know what it's called. For example, what note is an augmented 4th. above G on string 6 fret 3? While you're working it out, your finger would immediately follow the memorised aug 4 pattern and move 1 up - 1 up - i.e, string 5 fret 4 (C#). When you're playing, you don't have time to mentally name the required harmony note and then go looking for it. Apply the pattern, to get the required note instantly.

When it comes to keeping it in key, you have to make another adjustment, For example if you want to harmonise in 5ths above a melody in the key of C major, the pattern will be the same for all notes except for the note a 5th above the leading note (B) which will be one fret lower as it needs a diminished 5th (tritone) to stay in key - i.e F, not F#. All the rest are perfect 5ths so the pattern is exactly the same anywhere along the length of the fretboard

If you're interested, I have a webpage app that teaches all the patterns, not only for locating notes of intervals but also chord tones and scale degrees. It shows an unnamed section of fretboard. It's unnamed because the same patterns apply regardless of which section of the fretboard you use. It prevents you from thinking in note name and forces you to think in patterns.

Check it out on a laptop - not a phone as it's Flash-based and won't display on phones. And ask about anything that isn't clear. I'm always interested to know how people use it. The default setting is for chord tones so select the 'intervals' tab under the white text box and click play.

Here it is www,fretsource-guitar.weebly.com/fretboard-navigation-trainer.html
Changed By: Fretsource
Change Date: May 01, 2017 01:25AM

Re: Problem when creating harmonies
If you're a guitarist and mostly play in standard tuning then you should learn all the fretboard interval patterns. As, I'm sure you know, octaves follow the 2-up, 2-up rule, meaning any note on string 6 & 5 can be found two strings higher and 2 frets higher. (for strings 4 & 3 it's 2 up and 3 (frets) up).

The same applies to every interval, Each has a pattern that can be memorised.

For example, Perfect 5ths are 1 up 2 up, so from any note on strings 6, 5 or 4, a perfect 5th above can be found 1 string higher and 2 frets higher. Again, the 'formula' changes for strings 3 (1 up - 3 up).

By learning the patterns, you can instantly find the right note even if you don't immediately know what it's called. For example, what note is an augmented 4th. above G on string 6? While you're working it out, your finger would immediately follow the memorised pattern and move 1 up - 1up - i.e, string 5 fret 2 (C#). When you're playing, you don't have time to mentally name the required harmony note and then go looking for it. Apply the pattern, to get the required note instantly

If you're interested, I have a webpage app that teaches all the patterns, not only for locating notes of intervals but also chord tones and scale degrees.
By learning the patterns, you can instantly find the right note even if you don't immediately know what it's called. For example, what note is an augmented 4th. above G on string 6? While you're working it out, your finger would immediately follow the memorised pattern and move 1 up - 1up - i.e, string 5 fret 2 (C#). When you're playing, you don't have time to mentally name the required harmony note and then go looking for it. Apply the pattern, to get the required note instantly.

When it comes to keeping it in key, you have to make another adjustment, For example if you want to harmonise in 5ths above a melody in the key of C major, the pattern will be the same for all notes except for the note a 5th above the leading note (B) which will be one fret lower as it needs a diminished 5th (tritone) to stay in key - i.e F, not F#. All the rest are perfect 5ths so the pattern is exactly the same anywhere along the length of the fretboard

If you're interested, I have a webpage app that teaches all the patterns, not only for locating notes of intervals but also chord tones and scale degrees. It shows an unnamed section of fretboard. unnamed because the same patterns apply regardless of which section of the fretboard you use. It prevents you from thinking in note name and forces you to think in patterns.

Check it out on a laptop - not a phone as it's Flash-based and won't display on phones. And ask about anything that isn't clear. I'm always interested to know how people use it. The default setting is for chord tones so select the 'intervals' tab under the white text box and click play.

Here it is www,fretsource-guitar.weebly.com/fretboard-navigation-trainer.html

Original Message

Author: Fretsource
Date: May 01, 2017 01:03AM

Re: Problem when creating harmonies
If you're a guitarist and mostly play in standard tuning then you should learn all the fretboard interval patterns. As, I'm sure you know, octaves follow the 2-up, 2-up rule, meaning any note on string 6 & 5 can be found two strings higher and 2 frets higher. (for strings 4 & 3 it's 2 up and 3 (frets) up).

The same applies to every interval, Each has a pattern that can be memorised.

For example, Perfect 5ths are 1 up 2 up, so from any note on strings 6, 5 or 4, a perfect 5th above can be found 1 string higher and 2 frets higher. Again, the 'formula' changes for strings 3 (1 up - 3 up).

By learning the patterns, you can instantly find the right note even if you don't immediately know what it's called. For example, what note is an augmented 4th. above G on string 6? While you're working it out, your finger would immediately follow the memorised pattern and move 1 up - 1up - i.e, string 5 fret 2 (C#). When you're playing, you don't have time to mentally name the required harmony note and then go looking for it. Apply the pattern, to get the required note instantly

If you're interested, I have a webpage app that teaches all the patterns, not only for locating notes of intervals but also chord tones and scale degrees.

Check it out on a laptop - not a phone as it's Flash-based and won't display on phones. And ask about anything that isn't clear. I'm always interested to know how people use it. The default setting is for chord tones so select the 'intervals' tab under the white text box and click play.

Here it is www,fretsource-guitar.weebly.com/fretboard-navigation-trainer.html