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Modulating from c minor to g minor

Posted by Delos 
Hey,

How would i modulate cm to it's dominant which is Gm?
What should my chords go? atm i have

Cm Dm--- how to I modulate to Gm? Do i have to add any ta? coz my teacher said a ta modulates to the dominant.
Re: Modulating from c minor to g minor
May 26, 2009 08:51PM
Delos Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Hey,
>
> How would i modulate cm to it's dominant which is
> Gm?
> What should my chords go? atm i have
>
> Cm Dm--- how to I modulate to Gm? Do i have to add
> any ta? coz my teacher said a ta modulates to the
> dominant.

Bit of clarification first for the benefit of other readers:

The Dominant *chord* of the key of Cm is G (and C Major as well of course).

The "key of the Dominant" is the key built on scale degree 5 - but not using the "leading tone" alteration.

So to modulate to the Dominant in C Major, you'd modulate to G Major, but to modulate to the Dominant of C minor, you'd modulate to G *minor* (I mention this simply because many people confuse this issue).

Delos, Gm, with 2 flats, and Cm, with 3 flats are considered "closely related keys".

There are 5 basic forms of modulation:

Common Chord Modulation
Common Tone Modulation
Direct Modulation (also called Phrase Modulation)
Sequential Modulation (which might be considered a specialized type of Direct Modulation)
And what some people call "monophonic" modulation because it typically happens with an unaccompanied melodic line, though it's really a type of "gradual" modulation where elements of new keys are introduced over time.

In closely related keys, Common Chord modulations are most frequently used (though other types are certainly possible).

Generally speaking, the Tonic or Dominant of either of the keys are not necessarily the best chord to use as your common chord. You need an "ambiguous" chord - one that's not too strong in either key. Here are the chords in each key:

Cm Do Eb Fm G Ab Bo (Gm and Bb in their non-dominant forms as well)

Gm Ao Bb Cm D Eb F# (Dm and F in their non-dominant forms).

Eb as III in Cm, and VI in Gm would be your "best" common chord.

Cm - G - Cm - Fm - Do - Eb - D7 - Gm

Other common chords are certainly possible - Ab for example is VI in Cm, and the Neapolitan in Gm. Also you could use non-dominant forms like:

Cm - Bb - Eb - D7 - Gm

The Bb sounds a little like it's modulating from Cm to the key of the relative major, Eb - Bach opens a lot of Chorales this way. Here, the Eb and the Bb are ambiguous, and even the Cm (iv in Gm) is somewhat sneaky.

It really depends on how "abrupt" or how "sneaky" you want your modulation to be. For example, in Cm, you could introduce a C *major* chord, and then move that to D7 - then you'd be treating the C as V/iv or I in Cm, and as IV in Gm - and Major IV does occur in minor keys when moving to V in this way.

HTH,
Steve






Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 05/26/2009 08:53PM by stevel.
could anyone give a hand on this modulation: A major to c minor.
Thank you kindly
Re: Modulating from A Major to c minor
November 10, 2009 04:24PM
Daniel Timmermans Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> could anyone give a hand on this modulation: A
> major to c minor.
> Thank you kindly

Try this:

A - D - D7 - G - G7 - Cm


Re: Modulating from c minor to g minor
November 11, 2009 03:35PM
This works too:

A - Bdim7 - Cm

Bdim7 is a pivot chord, because it works as a substitute for both E7 (V of A) and G7 (V of Cm).
Strictly speaking, it's not in key of A (because of the F), so a transition chord might help:

A - Bm7 - Bdim7 - Cm

Here's another idea (variation on Fretsource's)

A - D - Dm - Fm (or Dm7b5) - G7 - Cm
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