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Question about AiC

Posted by thazklein 
Question about AiC
August 01, 2015 06:14PM
Hey guys, I dont feel very comfortable for asking you this , because youve helped me a lot already. But as I haven't found anywhere on the whole internet then I came here to ask something once again. So the question is about Jerry Cantrell/Alice in Chains. I love this band and their solos. So the question is: how is it called the notes that jerry plays on his solos? Like, sometimes he plays some notes that are kinda out of the scale but STILL it sounds pretty dope, pretty cool.

For example: [www.youtube.com] pay attention to it's solo. Some notes are like out of scale I dont know, it sounds pretty good, its different I like its kind of playing style, so what am I suppose to do to improvise using this style of playing? Thanks in adv.! :-)
Re: Question about AiC
August 02, 2015 11:26AM
There are two types of notes that are not in the Key. One is Chromatic Notes.

Chromatic means "color" and basically there are 7 notes in the Key and 5 notes not in the Key. Those 5 notes add "color" to the notes in the key in various ways.

The other, more likely in this case, is Blue Notes.

Blue notes are like Chromatics in that they're not in the key, but they're more specific in the way they're used. The idea comes from the Blues genre, where players played "out of key" notes in an otherwise "key-based" context. Virtually all rock and heavy rock music has some of this Blues influence in there somewhere.

Your best bet would learn to play the solo note for note and then figure out which notes are in the key and which are not, and what affect each type has on the sound. The more things like that you learn, the easier it will be to incorporate them into your own playing.

Simply "playing X scale" is not going to make you sound like him, or anyone else, and it only gets you part way into the sound you want.
Re: Question about AiC
August 03, 2015 03:07AM
stevel Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> There are two types of notes that are not in the
> Key. One is Chromatic Notes.
>
> Chromatic means "color" and basically there are 7
> notes in the Key and 5 notes not in the Key. Those
> 5 notes add "color" to the notes in the key in
> various ways.
>
> The other, more likely in this case, is Blue
> Notes.
>
> Blue notes are like Chromatics in that they're not
> in the key, but they're more specific in the way
> they're used. The idea comes from the Blues genre,
> where players played "out of key" notes in an
> otherwise "key-based" context. Virtually all rock
> and heavy rock music has some of this Blues
> influence in there somewhere.
>
> Your best bet would learn to play the solo note
> for note and then figure out which notes are in
> the key and which are not, and what affect each
> type has on the sound. The more things like that
> you learn, the easier it will be to incorporate
> them into your own playing.
>
> Simply "playing X scale" is not going to make you
> sound like him, or anyone else, and it only gets
> you part way into the sound you want.

So its all about chromatism and trying new notes to the sound I'm doing. I think I got it, thanks Stevel!!
Re: Question about AiC
August 06, 2015 07:08PM
So I talked to a friend of mine who is musician, and he said the whole solo is tonal, there ain't any outside notes in there... so now I'm wondering... 'how am I going to take my soloing to this level?! It's Impossible!" The guy sounds brilliant at that solo and I thought what was going to take me into this level were the outside notes... I feel depressed...


stevel Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> There are two types of notes that are not in the
> Key. One is Chromatic Notes.
>
> Chromatic means "color" and basically there are 7
> notes in the Key and 5 notes not in the Key. Those
> 5 notes add "color" to the notes in the key in
> various ways.
>
> The other, more likely in this case, is Blue
> Notes.
>
> Blue notes are like Chromatics in that they're not
> in the key, but they're more specific in the way
> they're used. The idea comes from the Blues genre,
> where players played "out of key" notes in an
> otherwise "key-based" context. Virtually all rock
> and heavy rock music has some of this Blues
> influence in there somewhere.
>
> Your best bet would learn to play the solo note
> for note and then figure out which notes are in
> the key and which are not, and what affect each
> type has on the sound. The more things like that
> you learn, the easier it will be to incorporate
> them into your own playing.
>
> Simply "playing X scale" is not going to make you
> sound like him, or anyone else, and it only gets
> you part way into the sound you want.
Re: Question about AiC
August 07, 2015 01:59PM
"outside notes" don't take your playing anywhere. They're just "ingredients".

If you're making a Pasta Sauce, and you thrown in Cilantro, it's an "outside herb" because it's not typically found in Pasta Sauce. But it may not necessarily make your Pasta Sauce have some secret ingredient that makes it award-winning. It could just as easily taste "out of place".

In other words, music it's not about WHAT ingredients you use, but HOW you use them.

Cooking is an art as well - it's not just about following the ingredient list. It's about how you prepare the meal - cooking methods, thickening methods, chopping and dicing methods, marinating methods, seasoning methods and so on.

And what teaches you that is EXPERIENCE.

Don't worry about WHAT makes Cantrell's solo sound cool. Learn it. Learn other things you think sound cool. What you'll soon find is that you will intuit the elements that makes things sound cool.

Analyzing things to death is a dead end. When you analyze a meal, you end up with the Ingredients list and the RDA Label that shows it has 15 calories and 5% saturated fat, and 3 grams of fiber.

Big deal. That tells you nothing about how the food TASTES.

Learn to play music. As many pieces as you can. That's what's going to take your music-making to the next level - experience.

Steve
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