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Double Leading Tone

Posted by walters 
Double Leading Tone
August 22, 2005 05:14AM



When is a double leading tone used ?

Why does doubling the leading tone do ?

How do i resolve a Double leading tone?

Re: Double Leading Tone
August 25, 2005 11:46PM
This forum is not a homework service, but I'm sure people will be glad to help if you have questions about aspects of music theory that confuse you.

-Rob
Re: Double Leading Tone
August 26, 2005 12:08AM

Its not homework at all im just confused about this can you please help me
Re: Double Leading Tone
August 26, 2005 04:31PM
Hi --
Explain what you know already about double leading tones, and describe the part that confuses you. Then people will be able to help more.

Thanks!
Rob
Re: Double Leading Tone
August 26, 2005 07:30PM

The leading tone is the 7th step of the scale major,minor modes

The Double leading tone is Doubling the 7th in the chord

This is what im confused about:

When is a double leading tone used ?

Why does doubling the leading tone do ?

How do i resolve a Double leading tone?
Re: Double Leading Tone
August 28, 2005 10:32AM
Hi --
Here's a site that may help you out:
[www.dolmetsch.com]

This should help put counterpoint in the context of music history (there's also a music dictionary on that site that's pretty complete); it also links to an online book just about the principles of counterpoint if you are interested in pursuing this:
[www.musique.umontreal.ca]

I hope this helps!
-Rob
Re: Double Leading Tone
May 08, 2011 08:13AM
walters Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> > The leading tone is the 7th step of the scale
> major,minor modes

This is true. Also note that a leading tone must be manufactured in the minor mode by raising the seventh scale degree.

> The Double leading tone is Doubling the 7th in
> the chord

And this is not always true. The seventh of the tonic chord (provided it's a maj7 or m/maj7 chord) is the leading tone of its respective scale, but it hardly has a leading tone function when it's attached to the tonic chord. Rather, the leading tone is found at the third of the V chord, or the root of the viiĀ° chord. The problem that arises with a doubled leading tone is that it has a tendency to resolve to the tonic, so a doubling would put you at risk of having parallel octaves in your voice-leading. You can effectively get around this, though. Here is how I approach the problem:



This is the normal resolution of the V chord. There is only one leading tone, and I have used a line to indicate the resolution of leading tone to tonic. Let's put another leading tone in somewhere.



Okay, same sort of situation: the B in the soprano is resolving to C. That's the normal resolution of the leading tone. In the tenor voice, B is leaping down to the fifth of the tonic chord. When a leading tone resolves in this way, it is called a frustrated leading tone, if you want to look up more on the subject. Traditional harmony pedagogy teaches that a frustrated leading tone must be confined to an inner voice (i.e. not soprano or bass). By combining the two strategies, you can avoid parallel voice-leading.


Edit: Just realized this is an ancient thread. Ah, well. Hopefully, this will help somebody out.



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 05/08/2011 08:21AM by LuxembourgianSixth.
Re: Double Leading Tone
May 09, 2011 07:08PM
LuxembourgianSixth Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
Let's put another leading tone in
> somewhere.
>
> [i56.tinypic.com]
>
> Okay, same sort of situation: the B in the soprano
> is resolving to C. That's the normal resolution of
> the leading tone. In the tenor voice, B is leaping
> down to the fifth of the tonic chord. When a
> leading tone resolves in this way, it is called a
> frustrated leading tone, if you want to look up
> more on the subject. Traditional harmony pedagogy
> teaches that a frustrated leading tone must be
> confined to an inner voice (i.e. not soprano or
> bass). By combining the two strategies, you can
> avoid parallel voice-leading.
>
>
> Edit: Just realized this is an ancient thread. Ah,
> well. Hopefully, this will help somebody out.

Yes, ancient thread.

However, you're not quite all the way there.

Your example of a frustrated leading tone is not.

A frustrated LT *is* one that descends instead of ascends, but, it is still NOT DOUBLED.

F-E
B-G
D-C
G-C

The reason for frustrating the LT is so that you end up with a full tonic chord (RR35). If you don't frustrate the LT you end up with a tripled root (RRR3) which is OK for final chords (and not uncommon).

In order the frustrate the LT, it needs to be in something other than the Soprano (so if it is in the Soprano, you are forced to use a final chord with a tripled root, or your V7 will need to be incomplete (RR37 instead of R357).

The only time you double the LT is when it's not the LT :-)

When is it not the leading tone? When scale degree 7 is not functioning as such - for example, in a non-Dominant chord.

This would be iii in Major (or more likely, iii6).

E - E
B - A
B - C
G - A

Could happen for example.

Steve
Re: Double Leading Tone
May 10, 2011 02:56AM
Why would a leading tone that descends not be frustrated, given the stipulation that it is doubled? "Frustrated" describes the resolution (or lack thereof) of the leading tone. In a contrapuntal texture, this will be heard regardless of what the other voices are doing. Granted, having a doubled leading tone is just crummy voice-leading, but I don't see why the presence of one resolution negates the other, why a leading tone is no longer frustrated if it is used to fix a voicing error rather than simply to achieve a tonic triad with all of its members.

Personally, I would never consider doubling a tendency tone, but if I was faced with the problem of a V chord with two thirds in it, I would approach it as I did above. Still, it's a waste of a perfectly good voice - stick another root or a ninth on that sucker if you want that fifth in the I. Also, my own opinion is that the satisfaction of a properly resolved leading tone (especially when part of a tritone) far outweighs that of a complete tonic chord. Sorry, fifth. >:D<
Re: Double Leading Tone
May 10, 2011 12:54PM
Let me try to re-explain this:

If you're following CPP rules, then you simply don't double the leading tone. Period.

When a *single* leading tone is present in a Dominant function chord, it may, and typically does, resolve upward to the tonic.

However, a composer may choose to "frustrate" the leading tone provided it is not in an upper voice. Generally speaking, the reason for doing so is to create a Tonic with a complete (two roots, a 3rd and 5th) rather than an incomplete (three roots and a 3rd) chord - the latter being a result of the "un-frustrated" resolution (in other words, a composer chose to have an incomplete tonic chord, or by frustrating the leading tone, a complete tonic chord, but in neither case is the LT doubled).

So again, the only time one would double the 7th scale degree in Major would be when it is part of a non-dominant chord, primarily a iii (usually a iii6) in which case it's lost its "leading tone" function, and will resolve according to normal pat writing procedures.


Steve
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