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I NEED HELP WITH INVERSIONS!

Posted by Adam 
I NEED HELP WITH INVERSIONS!
May 05, 2005 09:34PM
I really need help with inversions! I don't understand them one bit! First inversions, 6/4 and all that stuff! I would like some assistance Thanks
Re: I NEED HELP WITH INVERSIONS!
May 08, 2005 05:09PM
Hi, Adam!

The important thing to remember with inversions is that you're working with a regular chord (such as C E G for a C-major triad), but the lowest note is NOT the root of the chord. The lowest note is what's most important.

The I 6/4 and so on are part of "roman numeral notation".

Some of this stuff sounds complicated, but once you recognize the notation it's not hard. Try the tutorials at [musictheory.net] for helpful walkthroughs -- specifically, "Interval Inversion" and "Roman Numeral Analysis".

Some more hints:
The normal way to invert a chord is to move the lowest note up an octave. You still have the same chord (it's the same notes, after all!), but if you do this once, the lowest note is now the third. In our C major chord, the E is lowest (your chord from bottom to top now looks like E G C).

To get a *second* inversion, do the same thing again -- move the lowest note (the E) up an octave, so the chord now looks like G C E, bottom to top. It's still a C chord (you have a C, E, and G in there) but this is called the second inversion.

More about roman numeral notation -- basically, a first-inversion triad is written with a little "6" because that's the interval from the low note (E, in C-major 1st inversion) to the moved note (C). A second inversion chord is written with a little "6" and a "4" below it -- notating the intervals of the 2 moved notes.

Good luck!
Re: I NEED HELP WITH INVERSIONS!
February 05, 2006 04:19PM
Hi,

How do you know the difference between an inversion and a regular chord?

For example,

IV6 and vi?

Thanks,
Catherine

P.S. Do you have any tips on figuring out the cadence in phrases?
Re: I NEED HELP WITH INVERSIONS!
February 08, 2006 04:20PM
Catherine Wrote:
> How do you know the difference between an
> inversion and a regular chord?
>
> For example,
>
> IV6 and vi?

Well, an inversion is the same as a regular chord, but the lowest note is not the root of the chord. So if you're in C major, a IV chord will be F A C. The IV6 chord is the same notes, but with the A as the lowest note: A C F (or even A F C).

A vi chord is A C E -- just notice it has F instead of E.

>
> P.S. Do you have any tips on figuring out the
> cadence in phrases?

Maybe other readers will have some good tips -- I guess I'd just say, try and listen to the music if you can (it's usually fairly easy to hear where the cadences are) -- or watch the music for its pauses. You can probably hear whether a cadence is deceptive, plagal, etc.., and/or just analyse the chords and check it that way.

When analysing chords, you can jot down the notes you see -- say, F# D A C -- then see if there's a way to stack them into 3rds (D F# A C, a dominant 7th chord).

-Rob
Re: I NEED HELP WITH INVERSIONS!
March 21, 2006 06:51AM
i'd say that cadences go from a maximum level of completeness and down in this order:

Perfect Authentic V7-I,
Authentic V-I,
Plagal VI-I,
and Deceptive V-vi ~ this is arguably more cadenzal than the Plagal, but listen to the phrase, and determine where it sounds like the music changes...and there is where you will find 'em >.<

«[www.hippsta.com]» Commercial Music Licenses, Advanced Music Theory, Private Music Lessons
Go the the library and get hold of Rudiments of Music by S Macpherson P 41 and you will get it.
pam
Re: I NEED HELP WITH INVERSIONS!
June 17, 2009 07:10PM
I am looking for online assistance with chordal analysis and music analysis practice. Where can I look for something to help me practice this?
Re: I NEED HELP WITH INVERSIONS!
June 18, 2009 12:13PM
Pam,

Just a bit of advice - rather than respond to an existing thread that's from 2005 (!) why don't you just go ahead and ask a new question?

Your question has little to do with the original post so someone just scanning through the titles might miss your request for help.

Google "Music Theory" and "Music Theory Analysis Practice" and see what you get.

Ultimately, Theory is such a hard subject that you need to have either an instructor to correct you, or a textbook that includes answers in the back so you can check your work. There's no sense practicing and not being able to correct any errors!

HTH,
Steve
Re: I NEED HELP WITH INVERSIONS!
August 31, 2009 01:46PM
I know i had a very good teacher one of the top ones in the country and he use to say that a lot of musicians ruined by false concept of theory

anyways to get a book you can use Emule and Rapidshareware to get books if you are too lazy

Another point I would like to make at this point is that all of this numbers are meant to help you to express Emotions and thoughts musically. They are model just use them to get ideas don't become a computer!!! because that's the reason people dill with numbers are not musicians! Just get one concept at a time.

hope this link help a lot more stuff at emule too!

[rapidlibrary.com]

and remember not to mix inversions with the complex chords i.e. the chord where the bass is different because of musical consideration that non related to inversions
Re: I NEED HELP WITH INVERSIONS!
December 06, 2009 03:59PM
Hey Adam,

Inversions are actually pretty simple. If you take a C major chord and pick apart the notes in it, C, E, and G, then by playing it in a first inversion all you are doing is putting the third in the bass, or the E. In other words, the third is in a lower octave than the other two notes in the triad. With a second inversion you are just putting a fifth in a lower octave than the third and the root. It is my understanding that it doesnt matter which octave the 2 other notes are in in a first or second inversion so long as the third or fifth is in a lower octave than either of them.

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