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What are Tritones?

Posted by walters 
Re: What are Tritones?
September 20, 2010 05:37PM
Mduduzi Wrote:
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> How are tritones used, do you substitude a chord
> with a tritone?

Tritones are often used in Jazz in place of a full chord. In other words, you can IMPLY a Dominant 7 harmony (common in Jazz) using just the 3rd and 7th of the chord - which are a tritone.

So for C7, you use E and Bb - that's the tritone and in the right context it can imply a full C7 chord.

But tritones are also used in all kinds of other musical situations so it's difficult to answer your question fully with more info.

BTW, as Jon points out replying to posts that are 2 years old makes things hard to follow. If you have a question, it's best to start a new thread.

Best,
Steve
ajewole Ashy
Tritones as passing chords?
May 28, 2013 01:06AM
When playing, is it advisable to use tritones specifcally in your passing chords.
Re: Tritones as passing chords?
May 28, 2013 02:24AM
ajewole Ashy Wrote:
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> When playing, is it advisable to use tritones
> specifcally in your passing chords.

Did you read the last line of the previous post? ;-) This thread is nearly 3 years old.
Re: so how will i use d counting of d interval to form a chord
July 02, 2013 11:20PM
how will I use d counting of d interval to form a chord
Re: so how will i use d counting of d interval to form a chord
July 04, 2013 02:39PM
timmyboard Wrote:
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> how will I use d counting of d interval to form a
> chord

This is a 3 year old thread. Start a new thread.

And please ask a question that makes sense.

Steve
Des Chisholm
Re: What are Tritones?
August 04, 2015 03:19PM
No, it divides an octave into 2 equal parts… not 3, thus:
C, c#, d, d#, e, f, F#, g, g# a, a#, b, C.
|…………………….|………….….…….|
Root to flattened 5/Root to flattened 5th.

In the scale of C, the F# is the flattened 5th note which divides the C major scale in half - *not 3*.
C, c#, d, d#, e, f, F#, g, g# a, a#, b, C - like this: (Hope the 3 lines below align correctly.
|<…………….…>|<………….………>|
Root to flattened 5/Root to flattened 5.
1st half...............| 2nd half...............|

Another way to look at it is; There are 7 chromatic notes from C to F# and 7 chromatic notes from *that* F# to C… the upper octave, C.
The same thing goes for so-called 'semi tones'... A tone is a sound and you can't have 'half a sound', it either sounds, or it doesn't. For that reason I prefer micro-intervals rather than microtones...as in Indian music.

In my opinion it is equally daft to call the interval between B and C, or E and F a half step. It's like scaling a ladder, or a walk down the road. A half step gets you lifting 1 leg up and not putting it down, so you’re standing still. Equally, while if you're climbing up/down a ladder, you can't take half a step because again, you'd just be standing on one leg...not moving up and not moving down. I prefer to call those intervals, steps.

My way, to describe a major scale *from its root* you could say, ‘Do a two-step, two-step, 1, 2 then a two-step, two-step, 1.’ It’s similar to counting 2 bars rhythmically; An-a 1 and 2 and 3, 4, an-a 1 and 2 and 3, rest.
(Repeat count)....But that's another subject, eh?
Re: What are Tritones?
August 04, 2015 04:35PM
What is it about this particular old thread?? "diabolus in musica" giving the zombie life yet again? :-D
Re: What are Tritones?
August 05, 2015 10:50AM
I thought I deleted the post.

Oh well.
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